Drivers

Between 1989/90 and 1997/98, total distance driven has increased by one third. This is partly due to an increase in the number of driving-age New Zealanders.

  • Overall mobility has also increased. On average, people in all age groups are driving further than in 1989/90.
  • People in the 35-49 age groups do the most driving.
  • Men make up just under half of the driving-age population. However, they do 61% of the total distance driven in cars and vans.
  • Most driving trips are short. One third are under 2 km long and two thirds are under 6 km. Men do more long driving trips than women.

Annual Distance driven per person in cars, vans or utes

Most driving trips are short. One third are under 2 km long and two thirds are under 6 km. Men do more long driving trips than women.

Passengers

  • Between 1989/90 and 1997/98, total passenger travel in cars, vans and utes increased by 15%.
  • Children under five do more passenger travel per person than any other age group. (The 1989/90 survey did not include children under five, so there is no estimate from that survey for this group).
  • As might be expected, all children under driving age do a lot of passenger travelling. Fifteen to 24 year olds, who are less likely than older people to own their own car, also do a significant amount. Unlike younger children, this group may be driven by friends in the same age group as well as by parents.

Annual distance per person travelled as a passenger

Bus and taxi trips

Teenagers are the heaviest users of buses. Almost half of all bus trips are made by this age group.

Taxis account for only 1% of passenger travel, with people in their 20s and 30s the heaviest users.

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